“Scrap tax changes” – every residential landlord

New research from Paragon Mortgages reveals that most Buy to Let (BTL) landlords want the Government to reverse changes made to the way BTL investments are taxed. It may sound a little obvious, but the Paragon Mortgages PRS Trends report shows that landlords are aware of the changes in the way that BTL will be taxed. In the first quarter of 2017, 88% said that they fully understood the implications of tax relief changes, up from 71% six months prior. The Paragon PRS Trend report surveyed 201 residential landlords, asking what single ...

Number of landlords quitting Buy-to-Let market increases by 25%

Research from ARLA (The Association of Residential Lettings Agents) Propertymark suggests that the number of landlords quitting the Buy-to-Let sector is increasing, with a 25% rise in the last month. Changes to stamp duty and tax relief are continuing to cool the market, with a survey showing that four landlords per branch sold up in March, up from three in February. The survey, conducted by Opinium Research consisted of 331 member branches, and was carried out in April. The rise to four landlords per branch selling up is the highest number since ...

Pensions: Is tax-relief about to be cut?

Pensions: Is tax-relief about to be cut?One of the reasons many people pay into a pension is because of the tax-relief they receive. The quid pro quo for this additional boost to your pension pot, is that you have to leave it invested until you hit 55 (later for some younger savers retiring after 2028), but this is generally accepted, especially after the recent introduction of Pensions Freedom. However, with the election out of the way, and the Government searching for billions of pounds in savings, many people are predicting that tax-relief on pensions ...

A pension isn’t the only way to get tax-relief; what’s the other option?

A pension isn’t the only way to get tax-relief; what’s the other option?One of the main attractions of putting money into a pension is the tax-relief that you receive. If a basic rate taxpayer pays £80 into a pension, this is immediately ‘topped up’ by the Government to £100. A higher rate taxpayer can claim an extra £20; taking the net cost to just £60. Whilst pensions have certainly had a new lease of life following the introduction of Pensions Freedom in April, one of the criticisms still leveled at pensions is ...