Autumn Budget 2017: Were you a winner or a loser?

Autumn budget 2017 winnners and losers Every Budget has winners and losers; with some people faring better than others. So, how did you fare? Read on as we reveal whether you are a winner or a loser after Philip Hammond’s second Budget of 2017. Winners First-time buyers Those buying a home for the first time will now benefit from the abolishment of Stamp Duty on homes up to the value of £300,000. To ensure that this can help first-time buyers in high value areas, such as London, ...

Autumn Budget 2017: Everything you need to know

Autumn budget 2017 everything you need to know The Chancellor, Philip Hammond rose to his feet at 12.38 to deliver his second Budget of the year. The days leading up to the Budget have been dominated by talk of housing, Universal Credit and, most surprisingly, rail cards. Mr Hammond started in a bullish and optimistic mood, saying: “I report today on an economy that continues to grow, continues to create more jobs and continues to confound those who seek to talk it down.” He then turned to Brexit, saying that the UK ...

Interest rate rise: How will it affect you?

Interest rate rise How will it affect you It’s taken more than 10 years, but it’s finally happened. The Bank of England has decided to increase interest rates with the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) voting by 7-2 to increase base rate from 0.25% to 0.5%, principally in response to inflation hitting 3%. The rise was modest, not that you would have thought so from the acres of coverage it got, and only takes rates back to where they were in August last year. However, with inflation stubbornly above target, it is probably a ...

Self-employed pensions: Auto enrolment won’t catch everyone

Self-employed pensions Auto enrolment won’t catch everyoneAutomatic enrolment began in 2012 and the phase-in period for employers of all sizes is due to end in early 2018. But 4.8 million self-employed people have been left out. HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) reports that the number of self-employed Britons who actively pay into a personal pension pot has fallen from 950,000 to just 350,000 between the 2006/07 and 2015/16 tax years. This means that 4.4 million people are either using an alternative saving method, or, more likely, failing to ...